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Trailer Towing an XJ - Best Way

rbarton

NAXJA Forum User
Location
Acworth, GA
Hopefully, this forum is the best place for this question since my intended vehicle to be trailered has been modified for trail use. If not, please forgive my bad selection. The OEM forum just didn't seem to be the right place.

I finally found a trailer on which to transport my 96 XJ. What are you guys doing as far as strapping your XJ down? Types of straps, locations on the XJ, etc. Anything you are willing to share will be most helpful and appreciated!

Thanks!
 
Moved it to non-tech for ya.....
 
i use two 3" wide ratchet straps on the front, each around the axle and one to each front corner of my trailer. and i use one chain around the rear axle tube (watch out for brake lines) to the rear of the trailer and a chain binder to suck her down tight.
 
I use two 3" straps up front, there is about a 1" hole in the bottom of each side of the "frame". Just off the top of my head I think they'd be about 2' behind the axle. I slip the hook end of the strap in there, and cross to the oppisent side of the trailer toward the front. The rear I go under the left axle over the top front of the diff under the right axle both to the center of the rear of the trailer. I don't like doing the rear that way, I've only trailered mine twice, not that I have another strap, I think I'll try to find a better way.

.02

Daryl
 
would pictures work for ya

348rear-rings1-med.JPG


348front-rings-med.JPG


pretty much what was already explained .i used 2 ratchets to the body front and back then two chains around the axles.
 
somebody correct me if i'm wrong, but aren't you supposed to hook to the body/frame and NOT the axles- because the bearings need constant preload otherwise jolts up and down on them while on the trailer and the jeeps axles are not rotating can damage their bearings by hitting constanty in the same spot of the bearing.-???
 
i don't run my chains super tight .they are just there so to speak.they have tension but not alot.i use my straps for all the holding power the chains are for just incase emergency stopping
 
xuv-this said:
somebody correct me if i'm wrong, but aren't you supposed to hook to the body/frame and NOT the axles- because the bearings need constant preload otherwise jolts up and down on them while on the trailer and the jeeps axles are not rotating can damage their bearings by hitting constanty in the same spot of the bearing.-???


I've never considered that. Nor has it ever been a problem.....yet.

I use two 2" straps on the rear axle straight back and two of the same on front axle crossed to the opposite corners of the trailer. I'd like to to ratchet the front of the body down to prevent Jeep rocking on its suspension but I've yet to install a winch pumper with shackles.
 
my old man tows a lot of heavy farm/construction equipment & insists that i do it that way. i haven't heard of anybody who has had to replace stuff because of that on a car, but then again, compare prices on a set of jeep bearings to prices of the same for a 87' deere dozer....
 
When truckers transport cars, they use a hooks to the frame. When we got the new Chevy Corvette in they used straps around the tires to hold them down. The one new Corvette we got ended up having a leaky seal on it. Haha!
 
I have hauled cars for a living for 6 years(just quit doing that in Oct).
The best way is to tie it down to the frame. You can do this by using your aftermarket bumpers or the original frame tie down holes. These holes are oval and they sit on an angle. The rear ones are right in front of the spring hangar and the front one is right behind the lower control arm mount. These holes are reinforced so as to not pull out when you tie your vehicle down.

That being said there isn't really much wrong with tying your vehicle to the axles either.

The biggest thing to remember is to make sure you have straps or chains going frontward and backward.

One other thing...you guys using four straps AND chains....You are going way way overboard and wasting too much time. Four three inch straps have almost three times the tensil breaking strength of the chains. With four straps if you where to roll your trailer with the jeep attached...it would stay attached.
 
DrMoab said:
I have hauled cars for a living for 6 years(just quit doing that in Oct).
The best way is to tie it down to the frame. You can do this by using your aftermarket bumpers or the original frame tie down holes. These holes are oval and they sit on an angle. The rear ones are right in front of the spring hangar and the front one is right behind the lower control arm mount. These holes are reinforced so as to not pull out when you tie your vehicle down.

That being said there isn't really much wrong with tying your vehicle to the axles either.

The biggest thing to remember is to make sure you have straps or chains going frontward and backward.

One other thing...you guys using four straps AND chains....You are going way way overboard and wasting too much time. Four three inch straps have almost three times the tensil breaking strength of the chains. With four straps if you where to roll your trailer with the jeep attached...it would stay attached.
this is pretty much true. but i'll bet you used chains and dogs on your jhooks. chains don't stretch like straps do. i don't like to and don't use ratchet straps for tying vehicles down for this reason. with straps, it's about the max safe working load NOT BREAK STRENGTH! if the straps repeatedly stretch beyond that load they will weaken. the forces at hand can easily compound themselves as the strap is stretched.
pick up your favorite yank strap for wheelin. measure it. is it a couple of inches or so longer than what it was supposed to be brand new? i like the chain idea. it keeps the straps from stretching too much. i prefer using just chains.
 
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