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Clep test

RTicUL8

NAXJA Forum User
I’m working on my college undergraduate degree – about 15 years late.

I have 96 credit hours and need 128 to graduate.

One of the options that I’m seriously considering is taking the clep tests for some of the courses, including: English(composition), Spanish(humanities credit), ethics, business law, and management.

Has anyone here taken one of these tests before?
Suggestions on getting ready for the test?

Thanks.
 
I went back to school at 29, and graduated a year ago, so I can kind of relate.

I challenged a couple classes. They were freshman level computer classes that were very basic. One was intro-to-information systems, and the other was a windows class.

Trying to pass the the comp clep is difficult. I took the AP test in 1989 and scored high enough to waive 101, but after 10++ years my school wanted me to test again. The test was an essay, MLA citations, and they wanted no spelling or grammer errors. I didn't pass it.

I had to take 101, and 102 but am glad I did because of the massive ammounts of writing I had to do my senior year.

You can get the credits, but you will not really get the education if you challenge. The experience that comes from discussing ideas in a formal setting is what college is about. Just like the internet is the place for opinion and anecdotal evidence!

Good luck either way.
 
I have taken the CLEP lower division humanities and the upper division Civil War courses. I passed the humanities but missed the civil war by one point. They are not that hard if you study (which I really didn't do - ego problem). I have access to a good bit of CLEP study crap via the military. They have a hard-on for CLEP as part of the education services offices. Libraries usually have CLEP guides and amazon.com sells some CLEP prep books.
Check very carefully with the institution that you are seeking your degree from. They usually restrict how many units they will accept in non-traditional or CLEP. Also, many colleges require a minimum number of credits taken locally as a graduation requirement; usually around 30 or so.
I am in a similar situation as you, and am finishing my degree online. I have done everything from traditional classroom to internet and everything in between. In my experience, biting the bullet and taking classes at a real college are the easiest and cheapest solution to graduate if it is possible in your situation. As an adult learner you will find that your life experience and personal drive will bring you good grades. Instructors also always seemed to treat me a little different (better) than the late teens/early twenties dumbasses that I was in class with.
 
RTicUL8 said:
I’m working on my college undergraduate degree – about 15 years late.

I have 96 credit hours and need 128 to graduate.

One of the options that I’m seriously considering is taking the clep tests for some of the courses, including: English(composition), Spanish(humanities credit), ethics, business law, and management.

Has anyone here taken one of these tests before?
Suggestions on getting ready for the test?

Thanks.
There's a good chance your school (check the school's library as well) will have the study material for clep testing, so you may want to ask them. That's been my experience with the three universities I've attended. Also call your local library to see if they have any clep study material. And check out this site for anything clep. Hope this helps
 
I have to agree with the posts above. Talk to your advisor about what path they recommend. Its nice to get credits through challenging, but there is so much more to be learned by actually attending the classes. Your life experience will probably count for a great deal insofar as being able to do well in the courses, but what I have found really helpful over the years is the chance to integrate your life experience into the formal academic side of learning. Sometimes hearing how research and academics frames certain concepts that you already know through life experience and colloquial learning can vastly expand your understanding of them. Talk to your advisor. S/he will be able to assist you to make the best decision given your timeframe, money/investment and skill/ability level, not to mention what you plan to do with the degree when you are done. Sometimes, especially for undergraduate, its best just to finish so that you can get working at a different level within a field you already know, but it can also be very beneficial to learn the concepts as they are framed within the educational/academic/research contexts. All that said, challenge processes vary from program to program and college to college, so make sure you are aware of any potential pitfalls before undertaking the challenge process. There are many guides out there to assist you in challenging courses, take advantage of the expertise that is already out there. Good luck, and good on you for furthering your education later in life. I highly doubt you'll regret the process...
 
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